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What every Brain Owner should know about their Memory

Our brain is not so different from a computer after all. Here’s a closer look at the similarities between our memory and that of a computer. An overview of the computer process Memory-Computer-Analogy     1. The computer receives its input from keyboard, mouse or stylus, microphone or camera. 2. Next these inputs are processed […]

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Types of Memory: Importance of Sensory Memory

I have a tough time remembering names even though I can easily remember faces, events, ideas and concepts. Does that mean I have poor memory? The answer to that is not so straightforward. In the previous post on memory, we looked at the concept of short-term, long-term and working memory. Here’s a simple diagram that […]

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The Truth about Short-Term Memory

Have you see Memento where Guy Pearce has difficulties creating new long-term memories? What that means is that he only has his short-term memory working for him. The film was praised by neuroscientists as an accurate portrayal of the different memory systems that we possess. Types of memory So What is Short-Term Memory? Through attention, […]

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Long-Term Memory: What is that Elephantine Memory?

Elephantine memory So far, we have looked at sensory memory and short-term memory both of which last for under a minute. So how does one go about acquiring an elephantine memory? What are the secrets of long-term memory? Long-term memory involves actual physical changes made to the brain and is virtually limitless. In our computer, […]

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HIV Medications Linked to Increase in Alzheimer’s Disease Protein

A class of drugs called protease inhibitors have been lifesaving for people with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, these medications come with a long list of side effects that may include impairments in cognitive function. How protease inhibitors might cause cognitive side effects has remained a mystery for some time. New research from the […]

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Memory Process: How Do We Encode Our Memories?

So far we have looked at the different types of memory. Let us now look at the Memory Process and explore how sensory memory, short-term memory and long-term memory work together to create our memories. Have you ever moved house or transferred your possessions to storage? What does it involve? The memory process (also called […]

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A Vastly Underdiagnosed Brain Disorder That Brings Frequent Tears

The patient’s sobs did not stem from depression but a condition known as pseudobulbar affect  — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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FDA Approves New Drug to Treat ALS

 The drug may slow the progression of the disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Memory Process: How Do We Store and Retrieve Our Memories?

The Memory Process consists of encoding, storage and retrieval. (See the previous post on encoding.) In this post, we look at the storage and retrieval process. photo credit: peasap Storage involves the process of storing and consolidating memories. The following factors lead to  better storage and consolidation of memory. Repetition. In the post on neural […]

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The Multi-tasking Brain – Stories from the Web

photo credit: niezwyciezony [View the story “Multi-tasking and the Brain” on Storify] The Multi-tasking Brain – Stories from the Web is a post from: Brain Training For All Technorati Tags: brain fitness, brain function, multi-tasking Related posts: Does your brain support multi-tasking? The Brain’s Capacity to Direct Attention When your brain functions in conflict mode

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5 Things I Learned About Serious Mental Illness While Caring for My Brother

Over the past year since I published my memoir about caring for my brother Paul, who suffered from schizophrenia, I have encountered several misguided but firmly held beliefs that get in the way of understanding our fellow humans who suffer from a severe brain disorder. Here are just a few. 1. Probably the most common […]

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Denial – An Unorthodox Strategy For Coping With Cancer Diagnosis

Six-and-a-half years ago I was officially cured of brain cancer — specifically, a glioblastoma multiforme, the most lethal of brain tumors. GBM, as it’s known, has a median survival rate of one to two years. According to the Journal of Neuroepidemiology, a “population-based cure is thought to occur when a population’s risk of death returns […]

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Brain Blogging, Thirty-Fifth Edition

Welcome to the thirty-fifth edition of Brain Blogging. In this round, we cover the power of brain tumors in self identification, unconventional uses for classic anti-psychotics, the chemical nature of anger, and debate whether stress is real, and if so, how to deal with it. If you were left out, just leave a comment with […]

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Brain Blogging, Thirty-Sixth Edition

Welcome to the thirty-sixth edition of Brain Blogging. In this round, we cover the diagnostic dilemma in ADHD, novel radiological therapies for Aspergers, unravel cross-gender studies, and discuss personal stories of escaping depression through creativity. Remember, we review the latest blogs related to the brain and mind that go beyond the basic sciences into a […]

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Brain Blogging, Thirty-Seventh Edition

Welcome to the thirty-seventh edition of Brain Blogging. In this round, we try to uncover the neuropathology of Asperger’s syndrome, correlate sleep disturbances with chronic fatigue syndrome, link OCD to specific neuroanatomy, and discuss several brain fitness techniques. Remember, we review the latest blogs related to the brain and mind that go beyond the basic […]

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